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TREC NUTRITION: VITAMIN C ULTRA BIOFLAV

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VITAMIN C 1000 ULTRA BIOFLAV is a product with increased content of vitamin C (1000 mg) and a complex of citrus bioflavonoids designed for athletes. Vitamin C contributes to maintain the normal function of the immune system during and after intense physical exercise. This vitamin also contributes to the protection of cells from oxidative stress.

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TREC NUTRITION: VITAMIN C ULTRA BIOFLAV

Bioflavonoids are a group of what are called “polyphenolic” plant-derived compounds. They’re also called flavonoids. There are between 4,000 and 6,000 different varieties known. Some are used in medicine, supplements, or for other health purposes. Bioflavonoids are found in certain fruits, vegetables, and other foods, like dark chocolate and wine. They have potent antioxidant power. Why is this so interesting? Antioxidants may fight free radical damage. Free radical damage is thought to play a part in anything from heart disease to cancer. Antioxidants may even help your body deal with allergies and viruses.

Bioflavonoids are antioxidants. You may already be familiar with antioxidants, such as vitamins C and E and carotenoids. These compounds may protect your cells from free radical damage. Free radicals are toxins in the body that can damage healthy cells. When this happens, it is called oxidative stress. Other antioxidants, like flavonoids, may not be found in high concentrations in the bloodstream alone. But they may affect the transport or activity of more powerful antioxidants, like vitamin C, throughout the body. In fact, some supplements you’ll find at the store contain both vitamin C and flavonoids together for this reason.

Vitamin C, also known as L-ascorbic acid, is a water-soluble vitamin that is naturally present in some foods, added to others, and available as a dietary supplement. Humans, unlike most animals, are unable to synthesize vitamin C endogenously, so it is an essential dietary component. Vitamin C is required for the biosynthesis of collagen, L-carnitine, and certain neurotransmitters; vitamin C is also involved in protein metabolism. Collagen is an essential component of connective tissue, which plays a vital role in wound healing. Vitamin C is also an important physiological antioxidant and has been shown to regenerate other antioxidants within the body, including alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E). Ongoing research is examining whether vitamin C, by limiting the damaging effects of free radicals through its antioxidant activity, might help prevent or delay the development of certain cancers, cardiovascular disease, and other diseases in which oxidative stress plays a causal role. In addition to its biosynthetic and antioxidant functions, vitamin C plays an important role in immune function and improves the absorption of nonheme iron, the form of iron present in plant-based foods. Insufficient vitamin C intake causes scurvy, which is characterized by fatigue or lassitude, widespread connective tissue weakness, and capillary fragility. The intestinal absorption of vitamin C is regulated by at least one specific dose-dependent, active transporter. Cells accumulate vitamin C via a second specific transport protein. In vitro studies have found that oxidized vitamin C, or dehydroascorbic acid, enters cells via some facilitated glucose transporters and is then reduced internally to ascorbic acid. The physiologic importance of dehydroascorbic acid uptake and its contribution to overall vitamin C economy is unknown. Oral vitamin C produces tissue and plasma concentrations that the body tightly controls. Approximately 70%–90% of vitamin C is absorbed at moderate intakes of 30–180 mg/day. However, at doses above 1 g/day, absorption falls to less than 50% and absorbed, unmetabolized ascorbic acid is excreted in the urine. Results from pharmacokinetic studies indicate that oral doses of 1.25 g/day ascorbic acid produce mean peak plasma vitamin C concentrations of 135 micromol/L, which are about two times higher than those produced by consuming 200–300 mg/day ascorbic acid from vitamin C-rich foods. Pharmacokinetic modeling predicts that even doses as high as 3 g ascorbic acid taken every 4 hours would produce peak plasma concentrations of only 220 micromol/L . The total body content of vitamin C ranges from 300 mg (at near scurvy) to about 2 g. High levels of vitamin C (millimolar concentrations) are maintained in cells and tissues, and are highest in leukocytes (white blood cells), eyes, adrenal glands, pituitary gland, and brain. Relatively low levels of vitamin C (micromolar concentrations) are found in extracellular fluids, such as plasma, red blood cells, and saliva.

Intake recommendations for vitamin C and other nutrients are provided in the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) developed by the Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) at the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies (formerly National Academy of Sciences). DRI is the general term for a set of reference values used for planning and assessing nutrient intakes of healthy people. These values, which vary by age and gender, include: Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA): Average daily level of intake sufficient to meet the nutrient requirements of nearly all (97%–98%) healthy individuals; often used to plan nutritionally adequate diets for individuals. Adequate Intake (AI): Intake at this level is assumed to ensure nutritional adequacy; established when evidence is insufficient to develop an RDA. Estimated Average Requirement (EAR): Average daily level of intake estimated to meet the requirements of 50% of healthy individuals; usually used to assess the nutrient intakes of groups of people and to plan nutritionally adequate diets for them; can also be used to assess the nutrient intakes of individuals. Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL): Maximum daily intake unlikely to cause adverse health effects. Table 1 lists the current RDAs for vitamin C. The RDAs for vitamin C are based on its known physiological and antioxidant functions in white blood cells and are much higher than the amount required for protection from deficiency. For infants from birth to 12 months, the FNB established an AI for vitamin C that is equivalent to the mean intake of vitamin C in healthy, breastfed infants.

Table 1: Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) for Vitamin C [8]
AgeMaleFemalePregnancyLactation
0–6 months 40 mg* 40 mg*
7–12 months 50 mg* 50 mg*
1–3 years 15 mg 15 mg
4–8 years 25 mg 25 mg
9–13 years 45 mg 45 mg
14–18 years 75 mg 65 mg 80 mg 115 mg
19+ years 90 mg 75 mg 85 mg 120 mg
Smokers Individuals who smoke require 35 mg/day
more vitamin C than nonsmokers.

* Adequate Intake (AI)


RECOMMENDATION

Recommended use: Take a single serving of the product ‒ 1 capsule with 300 ml of water. Take 1 serving daily, after the main meal. Take 1 serving daily, preferably 30 min. before bedtime..Do not exceed the recommended daily dose. Food supplement should not be used as a substitute for a varied and balanced diet. A varied and balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle are recommended. Keep out of reach of children.



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TREC NUTRITION: VITAMIN C...

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